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dc.contributor.authorMartínez Pardo, Esmeraldo
dc.contributor.authorAlcaraz Ramón, Pedro Emilio
dc.contributor.authorRubio Arias, Jacobo Ángel
dc.contributor.authorMartínez Ruiz, Enrique
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T16:17:00Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T16:17:00Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-01
dc.identifier.citationMartínez-Pardo, E., Martinez-Ruiz, E., Alcaraz, P. E., & Rubio-Arias, J. A. (2015). Effects of whole-body vibration training on body composition and physical fitness in recreationally active young adults. Nutricion hospitalaria, 32(5), 1949-1959.es
dc.identifier.other10.3305/nh.2015.32.5.9672
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10952/3174
dc.description.abstractIn the last decade, it has been suggested that whole- body vibration training (WBV) may increase neuromuscular performance and consequently affect the muscular improvement as either acute response to vibration or chronic adaptation training. Vibrating platforms generate frequencies from 5-45 Hz and vertical oscillations of 1-11 mm peak to peak, affecting more or less intensity acceleration changing by combining frequency and amplitude. Vibration training, in a session as various offers different results in regard to changes in body composition and in increasing the vertical jump, sprint, and the different manifestations of force development. These promising results await further research to establish parameters (duration, frequency and amplitude) with vibration stimulation in young active subjects. This literature review provides an update on the scientific evidence on the body vibrations in order to answer the question whether WBV, meaning the exercise by increasing the gravitational load collection, is a treatment option if the aim is to improve neuromuscular function, flexibility, balance, agility, coordination and body composition.es
dc.description.abstractIn the last decade, it has been suggested that whole-body vibration training (WBV) may increase neuromuscular performance and consequently affect the muscular improvement as either acute response to vibration or chronic adaptation training. Vibrating platforms generate frequencies from 5-45 Hz and vertical oscillations of 1-11 mm peak to peak, affecting more or less intensity acceleration changing by combining frequency and amplitude. Vibration training, in a session as various offers different results in regard to changes in body composition and in increasing the vertical jump, sprint, and the different manifestations of force development. These promising results await further research to establish parameters (duration, frequency and amplitude) with vibration stimulation in young active subjects. This literature review provides an update on the scientific evidence on the body vibrations in order to answer the question whether WBV, meaning the exercise by increasing the gravitational load collection, is a treatment option if the aim is to improve neuromuscular function, flexibility, balance, agility, coordination and body composition.es
dc.language.isoenes
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectWhole body vibrationes
dc.subjectVibration exercisees
dc.subjectStrengthes
dc.subjectBody compositiones
dc.titleEffects of whole-body vibration training on body composition and physical fitness in recreationally active young adultses
dc.typearticlees
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses
dc.journal.titleNutrición Hospitalariaes
dc.volume.number32es
dc.issue.number5es
dc.description.disciplineActividad Física y Deportees


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