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dc.contributor.authorBurló, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorGabaldón, José Antonio
dc.contributor.authorPérez López, Antonio José
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez López, María Isabel
dc.contributor.authorCarbonell Barrachina, Ángel Antonio
dc.contributor.authorGómez López, Vicente Manuel
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-18T15:04:00Z
dc.date.available2021-01-18T15:04:00Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-01
dc.identifier.citationEvaluation of Pulsed Light to Inactivate Brettanomyces bruxellensis in White Wine and Assessment of Its Effects on Color and Aromatic Profilees
dc.identifier.isbn2304-8158
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10952/4761
dc.description.abstractBrettanomyces bruxellensis is a wine spoilage yeast that could be inactivated by pulsed light (PL); however, this technology may induce changes in the quality of this alcoholic drink. The present research aimed to determine the potential of PL to inactivate B. bruxellensis inoculated in white wine and to assess the effect of this technology on the color and aromatic profile of the wine. For this, a cocktail of B. bruxellensis strains was inoculated into the wine and its inactivation by PL was determined and fitted to a microbial inactivation model. Along with this, the effect of PL on instrument-measured color, and the volatile compounds of the wine were evaluated by GC/MS and descriptive sensory analysis, respectively. B. bruxellensis was inactivated according to the Geeraerd model including the tail effect, with a maximum inactivation of 2.10 log reduction at 10.7 J/cm2; this fluence was selected for further studies. PL affected wine color but the total color difference was below the just noticeable difference at 10.7 J/cm2. The concentration of 13 out of 15 volatile compounds decreased due to the PL, which was noticeable by the panel. It is not clear if these compounds were photolyzed or volatilized in the open reactor during treatment. In conclusion, PL is able to inactivate B. bruxellensis in white wine but the treatment impairs the volatile profile. The use of a closed reactor under turbulent flow is recommended for disaggregating yeast clumps that may cause the tailing of the inactivation curve, and to avoid the possible escape of volatile compounds during treatment.es
dc.language.isoenes
dc.publisherMDPIes
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPulsed lightes
dc.subjectWinees
dc.subjectBrettanomyces bruxellensises
dc.subjectColores
dc.subjectVolatile compoundses
dc.titleEvaluation of Pulsed Light to Inactivate Brettanomyces bruxellensis in White Wine and Assessment of Its Effects on Color and Aromatic Profilees
dc.typearticlees
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses
dc.relation.projectIDPMAFI/29/14es
dc.journal.titleFoodses
dc.volume.number9es
dc.description.disciplineCiencias de la Alimentaciónes
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/foods9121903es


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional