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dc.contributor.authorPiernas, Carmen
dc.contributor.authorReche García, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorMartínez Rodríguez, Alejandro
dc.contributor.authorSánchez Guerrero, Alejandra
dc.contributor.authorHernández Morante, Juan José
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-08T11:11:57Z
dc.date.available2024-02-08T11:11:57Z
dc.date.issued2022-08
dc.identifier.citationReche-García C, Piernas C, Martínez-Rodríguez A, Sánchez-Guerrero A, Hernández-Morante JJ. Dietary intakes among people with vs without food addiction: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Clin Nutr. 2022 Aug;41(8):1770-1780. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2022.06.033. Epub 2022 Jun 29. PMID: 35816869.es
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10952/7263
dc.description.abstractBackground & aims: Individuals with food addiction (FA) may experience addictive behaviours like those observed in other substances of abuse, which may affect their dietary intake habits. In fact, previous studies have reported associations between FA and dietary patterns, but this evidence has not been quantitatively summarised before. Therefore, this study aimed to explore differences in dietary intakes among adults with vs without food addiction. Methods: A systematic-review and meta-analysis was conducted. Interventional or observational studies evaluating dietary intakes associated with FA that used the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) were explored. PubMed, WoS and SCOPUS databases were searched up to September 2021, and selected articles were confirmed manually. Potentially eligible studies were checked independently by two researchers. YFAS and dietary habits were obtained from the studies selected by the search protocol. Standardized mean differences were retrieved and random effects meta-analyses were used for those studies reporting quantitative data. Results: From 162 potentially appropriate studies, 16 studies were finally included, all of which used cross-sectional designs. FA was generally related to higher intakes of total fat, proteins, sugar, and processed/energy-dense foods. The meta-analysis revealed that this association was only statistically significant in overweighted/obese individuals (P < 0.001 in all cases), while in those studies that included the general population (all weight categories), this association was not evident (p = 0.18). Conclusions: Being addicted to food was not associated with a higher energy intake in the general population. However, among those with overweight or obesity, FA was associated with higher energy and nutrient consumption. This provides evidence on the influence of addictive behaviours on dietary intake patterns of people with excess body weight and reinforces the concept of food addiction and its influence in the development of obesity.es
dc.language.isoenes
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectDietary intakeses
dc.subjectEnergy intakeses
dc.subjectObesityes
dc.subjectYFASes
dc.subjectFood addictiones
dc.titleDietary intakes among people with vs without food addiction: A systematic review and meta-analysises
dc.typearticlees
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses
dc.journal.titleClinical Nutritiones
dc.volume.number41es
dc.issue.number8es
dc.description.disciplineCiencias de la Alimentaciónes
dc.description.disciplinePsicologíaes
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clnu.2022.06.033es


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