Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLui, Y.
dc.contributor.authorCanovas, R.
dc.contributor.authorCrespo, G.A
dc.contributor.authorCuartero, M.
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-08T11:14:32Z
dc.date.available2024-02-08T11:14:32Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10952/7264
dc.description.abstractHerein, thin-layer potentiometry combined with ion-exchange membranes as barriers for charged interferences is demonstrated for the analytical detection of creatinine (CRE) in undiluted human urine. Briefly, CRE diffuses through an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) from a sample contained in one fluidic compartment to a second reservoir, containing the enzyme CRE deiminase. There, CRE reacts with the enzyme, and the formation of ammonium is dynamically monitored by potentiometric ammonium-selective electrodes. This analytical concept is integrated into a lab-on-a-chip microfluidic cell that allows for a high sample throughput and the operation under stop-flow mode, which allows CRE to passively diffuse across the AEM. Conveniently, positively charged species (i.e., potassium, sodium, and ammonium, among others) are repelled by the AEM and never reach the ammonium-selective electrodes; thus, possible interference in the response can be avoided. As a result, the dynamic potential response of the electrodes is entirely ascribed to the stoichiometric formation of ammonium. The new CRE biosensor exhibits a Nernstian slope, within a linear range of response from 1 to 50 mM CRE concentration. As expected, the response time (15–60 min) primarily depends on the CRE diffusion across the AEM. CRE analysis in urine samples displayed excellent results, without requiring sample pretreatment (before the introduction of the sample in the microfluidic chip) and with high compatibility with development into a potential point-of-care clinical tool. In an attempt to decrease the analysis time, the presented analytical methodology for CRE detection is translated into an all-solid-state platform, in which the enzyme is immobilized on the surface of the ammonium-selective electrode and with the AEM on top. While more work is necessary in this direction, the CRE sensor appears to be promising for CRE analysis in both urine and blood.es
dc.language.isoeses
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectSpectophotometryes
dc.subjectAnalytical chemistryes
dc.subjectRedox reactionses
dc.titleThin-Layer Potentiometry for Creatinine Detection in Undiluted Human Urine Using Ion-Exchange Membranes as Barriers for Charged Interferenceses
dc.typearticlees
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses
dc.journal.titleAnalytical Chemistryes
dc.volume.number92es
dc.issue.number4es
dc.description.disciplineFarmaciaes
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.9b05231es


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional